Archive for Resources

Register with Alzheimer’s Association TrialMatch

Clinical trials are essential to advancing Alzheimer’s disease research at a time when Alzheimer’s is reaching epidemic proportions. Through clinical studies conducted over the last 20 years, scientists have made tremendous strides in understanding how Alzheimer’s affects the brain. It is only through clinical studies that we will develop and test promising new strategies for treatment, prevention, diagnosis, and ultimately, a cure for Alzheimer’s disease.

To learn more about how to participate in clinical trial, watch the video below about TrialMatch (a free, clinical-trial matching service).

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Join a Support Group

Have you ever thought about attending a support group but were reluctant to give it a try?

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Support groups are a safe place to share feelings and experiences, and many people find them to be invaluable resources.

A support group is a place to:

  • Exchange practical information on caregiving problems and possible solutions
  • Talk through challenges and ways of coping
  • Share feelings, needs and concerns
  • Learn about resources available in your community

All of our support groups are facilitated by trained individuals. In addition to caregiver support groups, we also have support groups designed specifically for people in the early stages of Alzheimer’s. We are currently offering early stage support groups in Birmingham and Taylor (and soon, in Sterling Heights too!). To learn more or to register, please dial our 24/7 Helpline at 800-272-3900.

Want to find a Alzheimer’s Association support group near you? Click here. Prefer to get support online? Join AlzConnected, our online community.

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Spring Conference: Alzheimer’s Association – Greater MI Chapter

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Please join us for our 4th Annual Spring Conference “Breaking Through the Taboo of Alzheimer’s Disease” in collaboration with the Michigan Alzheimer’s Disease Center. This educational conference will take place on Tuesday, June 2nd from 8:00am-3:45pm at the Sterling Inn in Sterling Heights.

This conference will provide an unflinching look at several stigmas surrounding Alzheimer’s disease. The agenda will feature common taboo topics, such as decision making and ethical considerations. In addition, presenters will suggest practical strategies that professionals and family caregivers will find useful to enhance care provision and quality of life.

Breakfast and lunch will be provided. 4.5 Continuing Education Credits will be awarded to professionals.

Don’t delay…the discounted rate offered for early registration will be ending at close of business on Monday, May 11th!

To learn more and to register, please visit http://www.alz.org/gmc. We hope to see you on June 2nd!

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Create a TrialMatch Profile

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Clinical trials are essential to advancing Alzheimer’s disease research at a time when Alzheimer’s is reaching epidemic proportions. Through clinical studies conducted over the last 20 years, scientists have made tremendous strides in understanding how Alzheimer’s affects the brain. It is only through clinical studies that we will develop and test promising new strategies for treatment, prevention, diagnosis, and ultimately a cure for Alzheimer’s disease.

Today, the greatest obstacles to developing the next generation of Alzheimer’s treatments is recruiting and retaining clinical trial participants.

Exploring clinical trial options by yourself can be a steep mountain to climb. Alzheimer’s Association TrialMatch helps simplify the process by presenting clinical trial information in an easy to understand format.  In addition, we have staff that are happily waiting to answer your call, and guide you through the process.

Don’t just hope for a cure. Help us find one. Join the millions that are using TrialMatch, and discover the path to tomorrow’s treatments, today.

Want to get started? Visit http://www.alz.org/trialmatch or call 800-272-3900. Watch the video clip below to see the program in action.

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Clinical Trials for Alzheimer’s Research

clinical trials

Scientists have made enormous strides in understanding how Alzheimer’s disease affects the brain. Many of these insights point toward new therapies and improved ways to diagnose the disease and monitor its progression.

At any given time, dozens of studies are recruiting participants to help explore these exciting new approaches. Every clinical study contributes valuable knowledge, regardless of whether the experimental strategy works as hoped.

Without study participants, however, progress is stalled, and scientists report growing difficulty finding enough volunteers to complete these studies.

If you or a friend or family member has Alzheimer’s or another dementia — or even if you don’t — you can help advance knowledge about this illness. By participating in a clinical study, you can help new treatments, preventive strategies and diagnostic tools to become a reality.

What is a clinical study?

A clinical study is any medical research project involving human volunteers. Research into improved approaches usually begins with laboratory work or animal studies. Following early success with these methods, new strategies must demonstrate their effectiveness in the final proving ground of human testing.

What is a clinical trial?

A clinical trial is a specific type of study in which one group of volunteers gets an experimental treatment, while a similar group gets a placebo ( a look-alike “sugar pill”). Scientists evaluate the effect of the new treatment by comparing outcomes in the two groups.

Phases of clinical trials

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which regulates medical products and drugs, oversees a rigorous process for testing experimental treatments that is based on sequential phases. The treatments must perform well enough in each phase to progress to the next one. If a treatment performs adequately in all stages through Phase III, the FDA reviews the data and determines  whether to approve the drug for use in general medical practice.

  • Phase 1 trials, the first stage of human testing, typically enroll fewer than 100 volunteers. These studies are primarily concerned with assessing the safety of a drug and whether it has risks or side effects.
  • Phase II trials enroll up to a few hundred volunteers with the condition the drug is designed to treat. These studies provide further information about the safety of the drug and focus on determining the best dosage. Scientists also watch for signs of effectiveness, but Phase II trials are generally too small to provide clear evidence about benefit.
  • Phase III trials may enroll several hundred to thousands of volunteers, often at multiple study sites nationwide or internationally. Phase III trials provide the chief evidence for safety and effectiveness that the FDA will consider when deciding whether to approve a new drug.
  • Phase IV trials, also called post-marketing studies, are often required by the FDA after a drug is approved. The trial sponsor must monitor the health of individuals taking the drug to gain further insight into its long-term safety effectiveness and the best way to use it.

How to find a study near you

Alzheimer’s Association TrialMatch is a clinical studies matching service. TrialMatch uses information about your diagnosis, location and preferences to match a person with current clinical studies. Finding the right trial can be done over the phone or online. Once a match is found, and with your permission, a TrialMatch specialist will contact you to answer questions.

If you would like to consider participating in a clinical study, call 1-800-272-3900 or visit alz.org/trialmatch. More information about clinical studies can also be found at clinicaltrials.gov.

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What is an Adult Day Program?

adult day program dancing

Do you know what an adult day program is, and are you aware of the plethora of services their patrons can benefit from? Adult day programs are one of the most underutilized community resources, and yet, they provide valuable socialization and intellectual stimulation for the person with dementia. Exercise, meals, or even transportation to and from the program, are among some of the services that may be available. Perhaps most importantly, day programs offer much needed respite for the primary caregiver.

Want to learn more? Read below.

What are Adult Day Programs/Centers?

Adult day centers (a.k.a. adult day programs, adult daycare) offer group respite care that is provided outside the home and designed to meet the individual needs of the participants and to support strengths, abilities, and independence. Throughout the day, participants have the opportunity to interact with others while being part of a secure, structured environment. Daily activities  may include music, recreation, discussion, and support groups. Hours of service vary, but centers are often open 7-10 hours per day, 5-6 days per week. Transportation may be available. Adult day centers also give caregivers a break from caregiving. While the person with dementia is at a center, the caregiver will have time to rest, run errands, or finish other tasks. As a result, he or she may return to caregiving responsibilities feeling refreshed and renewed.

Getting Started

Adult day centers can vary. Consult a variety of sources to find a center that is suitable for your individual. Plan a visit to observe and ask questions. While visiting, notice if individuals are engaged in activities and if staff members treat each person as an individual with unique needs. Keep an open mind. You may want to visit without the person with dementia, then visit together for lunch or an activity.

But…what if my person does not want to go?

Know that initial resistance is not uncommon, but these feelings are often overcome through repeated exposure and positive experiences. It is sometimes helpful for caregivers to refer to the day program as going to school, work, a senior center, visiting with friends, etc., in order to encourage participation. Reassure the person if they express anxiety and reinforce the pleasant interactions/activities that await them at the day center. Consider using a center’s services at least twice a week for a month before making a final decision. If the adult day center does not seem to be working out, consider reintroducing it again after some time.

Questions to Ask

When choosing an adult day center, there are a number of factors to consider, including the staff, environment, programs and type of services available. The following list of questions may be helpful when checking out a day center:

Center clients

  • Does the center provide services for people with different types of impairments as well as those in good physical health?
  • Does the center provide specific services for individuals with dementia?

Assessment

  • Will the center evaluate the person’s needs, interests and abilities?
  • How will this evaluation be accomplished and how often will it be repeated?
  • Will medical needs, social and family history, cognitive functioning and social skills be assessed?

Programs and Services

Be sure the center offers the programs and services that you and the person with dementia need. The following are some of the specific services you may want to investigate. Keep in mind that few adult day programs offer all the services described below, and not all of the services are necessary for a program to be of high quality.

Activities

  • Does the center offer activities that the person can participate in and enjoy?
  • Are people with dementia separate from other participants or included in general activities?
  • Are participants involved in suggesting activities?
  • Is the schedule flexible and based on needs and interests?

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Personal care

  • Will the center’s staff help with grooming, toileting, eating, showering and other personal care tasks?

Nutrition

  • Does the center provide nutritious meals and snacks? You may want to sample a meal.
  • Can the center accommodate special diets or provide a culturally specific menu?

Health Services

  • Will the center provide blood pressure checks and physical, dental, foot, eye and ear examinations?
  • Will the center dispense medication and/or offer medication reminders?

Therapy

  • Will the center help arrange physical, occupational, or speech therapy?
  • Are there therapists onsite or on call?

Counseling

  • Will the center provide support for clients and families? For example, can they offer guidance on outside resources and arrange for supportive care in the home?

Special Needs

  • Is the center equipped to deal with someone who uses a wheelchair, is hearing or visually impaired or is handicapped in another way?

Operations

  • Who is the owner or sponsoring agency?
  • How many years have they been in operation?
  • Does the center have a license, certification or accreditation (is appropriate in that state)?
  • What are the hours of operation?
  • Is there a minimum number of hours required?
  • What are the policies regarding lateness or absence?

Cost

  • What is the daily cost?
  • What types of payments (e.g. Medicaid, long-term care insurance, military veteran’s benefits) are accepted?
  • Is there financial aid or a sliding scale rate — where caregivers pay according to ability or income?
  • Are there any additional charges for specific services?

Location and transportation

  • Is the center easy for you to get to?
  • Does the center offer its own transportation services?
  • Does the center recommend specific transportation providers?

Facility

  • What is the overall appearance and quality of the facility?
  • Is it warm, inviting and free of clutter?
  • Is there adequate space to accommodate activities for individuals with different needs?
  • Is there space available for outdoor activities?
  • Is the furniture clean and comfortable?
  • Are there secured areas for outside walking?

Staff

  • What are the staff qualifications?
  • What is the staff to client ratio?
  • Do staff members have dementia-specific training?
  • Are individuals with dementia treated with respect and dignity?
  • Does the center have a physician, nurse, or health care professional on staff or on call?
  • If the center uses volunteers, are they adequately trained and supervised?
  • Is staff warm and friendly to individuals, family members and caregivers?

It is also important to reevaluate your need for adult day services. At some point the person with dementia may need more care than the center can provide. Center staff and support groups can help evaluate your needs for future care.

Want to learn EVEN MORE and explore adult day programs that are nearby you? Call our 24/7 Harry L. Nelson Helpline at 1-800-272-3900, day or night!

 

 

 

 

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Community Resource Finder and other helpful online resources

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Caring for a person with Alzheimer’s or dementia often involves a team of people. Whether you help provide the daily care (e.g., assisting with meals and bathing), participate in the decision making (e.g., making care arrangements and legal and financial plans) or you simply care about a person with the disease — there’s much to do and plenty to know. But it doesn’t have to be a lot of work to find the resources and support you need. The Alzheimer’s Association and Alzheimer’s and Dementia Caregiver Center — alz.org/care — can help.

Check out any of the online resources below for more information.

ALZConnected

A social networking community where people with Alzheimer’s and related dementia, caregivers and others affected by the disease can share questions, experiences and practical tips via message boards or create private groups organized around specific topics.

Alzheimer’s Navigator

An interactive online tool for people living with dementia and those who participate in providing care and making care-related decisions. This assessment tool evaluates needs, outlines action steps and links the user to Alzheimer’s Association chapter programs and local services.

Community Resource Finder

A comprehensive database of local programs and services, housing and care options, and legal experts all in one location, allowing users to quickly search and find access and support.

Care Team Calendar

A free, personalized online tool, powered by Lotsa Helping Hands, that makes it easy to organize family and friends who want to help with caregiving and share activities and information among the care team.

 

 

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