Posts Tagged education

Calling All Caregivers…You’re Invited!

2017 Alzheimer’s Association Advocacy Forum

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The Alzheimer’s Association will soon be opening registration for the 2017 Advocacy Forum, and we would like to invite you to join us. The Alzheimer’s Association’s Advocacy Forum is a unique opportunity for Alzheimer’s advocates from across the country to gather in Washington, D.C. to directly appeal to their members of Congress about Alzheimer’s disease. Caregivers, persons with the disease, and those that have lost a loved one to Alzheimer’s receive training and embark on Capitol Hill to tell their story and ask for policy change to support our vision of a world without Alzheimer’s. In 2016, over 1,100 people from across the country (24 from Michigan) participated in this event.

Participants of past Forums have raved about this event as an empowering experience. After the Forum advocates feel charged up and ready to tell their story and make change happen. The helpless feeling that often accompanies Alzheimer’s for many is changed into a feeling of power and an opportunity to improve the lives of others.

The Alzheimer’s Association’s Advocacy Forum is also highly impactful for Members of Congress. In our experience, legislators listen intently when their constituents travel to our nation’s capitol to speak with them.

Alzheimer’s is a triple threat, with soaring prevalence, lack of treatment and enormous costs that no one can afford. If we’re going to address this triple threat, action must be taken by all levels of the government. Attending the Advocacy Forum is one way to take action, and we’d love to have you join us!

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About the Alzheimer’s Association’s Advocacy Forum

The 2017 Alzheimer’s Association’s Advocacy Forum will take place March 27-29, 2017 at the Marriott Wardman Park, Washington, D. C. To register and for event details like schedule, location, travel, and more, visit http://www.alz.org/forum or contact Lindsay Brieschke at lbrieschke@alz.org

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2016 Metro Detroit Fall Conference: A Meaningful Life with Alzheimer’s Disease

Early bird registration for our 5th Annual Metro Detroit Fall Conference “A Meaningful Life with Alzheimer’s Disease”, done in collaboration with Wayne State University’s Institute of Gerontology, is now open! The conference will bring together healthcare professionals, caregivers, family members, and individuals living with the early stages of memory loss on Friday, November 18th at Schoolcraft College’s VisTaTech Center in Livonia. Registration includes an entry to the conference, breakfast, lunch, as well as five continuing education credits for professionals.

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We are pleased to announce this year’s keynote speaker will be Beth A. D. Nolan, Ph.D.

Dr. Nolan serves as a Lead Mentor Trainer and Coach and directs research for Positive Approach to Care (PAC). Formerly an Assistant Professor at the University of Pittsburgh’s Graduate School of Public Health, Dr. Nolan received her Ph.D. in applied gerontology. She has worked with a variety of human services agencies to implement evidence-based programs for behavioral health, criminal justice, medicine, and senior living, and now works to help move caregivers to become carepartners.

Conference attendees will gain powerful insight into the true experiences of living with dementia as well as practical applications for implementing person driven care and methods to enhance quality of life. You will hear from individuals whose lives have been personally affected by this disease, engage in interactive activities and discover new resources and tools to assist families through their dementia journey.

 

To learn more visit

alz.org/gmc

or call our 24/7 Helpline at 800.272.3900

We hope to see you on November 18th!

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This conference is sponsored in part by Schoolcraft College.

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Register for the Longest Day

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Please join us for our Spring Conference in Troy!

5th annual Spring Conference

Please join us for our 5th Annual Spring Conference “Safe and Secure: Approaching Safety in Dementia Care” in collaboration with the Michigan Alzheimer’s Disease Center. We invite healthcare professionals, caregivers, family members, and individuals living in the early stages of memory loss to be our guests at this educational conference taking place on Tuesday, March 29th from 8:00am-3:45pm at the Somerset Inn in Troy. Breakfast and lunch will be provided. Five Continuing Education Credits will be awarded to professionals.

As Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia progress, one’s ability to make good decisions, exercise appropriate judgement, and maintain safety become impaired. Eventually, family and professional caregivers will assume responsibility for ensuring safety and promoting well-being. This conference will discuss various safety-related topics, such as managing medications, financial exploitation, and knowing when it is no longer safe to drive.

To learn more and to register, please visit http://www.alz.org/gmc. We hope to see you on March 29th! 🙂

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#HonorACaregiver

Woman and Mature Woman Hugging in the Kitchen

Did you know that November is National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month and National Family Caregivers Month? Many of us know firsthand the challenges that caregivng can bring, and yet, so often the work of the caregiver goes unacknowledged or unappreciated.

Join the Alzheimer’s Association in honoring the dedication of caregivers by sharing a personal tribute message on our page at alz.org/honor.

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2015 Alzheimer’s Association Facts and Figures

See the full report by clicking here.

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10 Ways to Love Your Brain

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Given the growing evidence that people can reduce their risk of cognitive decline, and in recognition of Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Month in June, the Alzheimer’s Association and its experts are sharing 10 Ways to Love Your Brain, tips that may reduce the risk of cognitive decline:

1. Break a sweat. Engage in regular cardiovascular exercise that elevates your heart rate and increases blood flow to the brain and body. Several studies have found an association between physical activity and reduced risk of cognitive decline.

2. Hit the books. Formal education in any stage of life will help reduce your risk of cognitive decline and dementia. For example, take a class at a local college, community center or online.

3. Butt out. Evidence shows that smoking increases risk of cognitive decline. Quitting smoking can reduce that risk to levels comparable to those who have not smoked.

4. Follow your heart. Evidence shows that risk factors for cardiovascular disease and stroke – obesity, high blood pressure and diabetes – negatively impact your cognitive health. Take care of your heart, and your brain just might follow.

5. Heads up! Brain injury can raise your risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Wear a seat belt, use a helmet when playing contact sports or riding a bike, and take steps to prevent falls.

6. Fuel up right. Eat a healthy and balanced diet that is lower in fat and higher in vegetables and fruit to help reduce the risk of cognitive decline. Although research on diet and cognitive function is limited, certain diets, including Mediterranean and Mediterranean-DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension), may contribute to risk reduction.

7. Catch some Zzz’s. Not getting enough sleep due to conditions like insomnia or sleep apnea may result in problems with memory and thinking.

8. Take care of your mental health. Some studies link a history of depression with increased risk of cognitive decline, so seek medical treatment if you have symptoms of depression, anxiety or other mental health concerns. Also, try to manage stress.

9. Buddy up. Staying socially engaged may support brain health. Pursue social activities that are meaningful to you. Find ways to be part of your local community – if you love animals, consider volunteering at a local shelter. If you enjoy singing, join a local choir or help at an afterschool program. Or, just share activities with friends and family.

10. Stump yourself. Challenge and activate your mind. Build a piece of furniture. Complete a jigsaw puzzle. Do something artistic. Play games, such as bridge, that make you think strategically. Challenging your mind may have short and long-term benefits for your brain.

To learn more, click here: abam2015_infographic

 

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