Posts Tagged Research

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Clinical trials are essential to advancing Alzheimer’s disease research at a time when Alzheimer’s is reaching epidemic proportions. Through clinical studies conducted over the last 20 years, scientists have made tremendous strides in understanding how Alzheimer’s affects the brain. It is only through clinical studies that we will develop and test promising new strategies for treatment, prevention, diagnosis, and ultimately a cure for Alzheimer’s disease.

Today, the greatest obstacles to developing the next generation of Alzheimer’s treatments is recruiting and retaining clinical trial participants.

Exploring clinical trial options by yourself can be a steep mountain to climb. Alzheimer’s Association TrialMatch helps simplify the process by presenting clinical trial information in an easy to understand format.  In addition, we have staff that are happily waiting to answer your call, and guide you through the process.

Don’t just hope for a cure. Help us find one. Join the millions that are using TrialMatch, and discover the path to tomorrow’s treatments, today.

Want to get started? Visit http://www.alz.org/trialmatch or call 800-272-3900. Watch the video clip below to see the program in action.

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Check out our Fall Conference on November 21st!

Please join us for our 5th Annual Fall Conference “A Meaningful Life with Alzheimer’s Disease” in collaboration with Wayne State University’s Institute of Gerontology. We invite healthcare professionals, caregivers, family members, and individuals in the early stages of memory loss to be our guests at this educational conference taking place on Friday, November 21st from 7:30am-3:15pm at Schoolcraft College’s Vista Tech Center in Livonia, MI. Breakfast and lunch will be provided and five (5) continuing education units are available for social workers, nurses, nursing home administrators, occupational therapists, physical therapists and speech therapists.

Fall Conference

Attend this event and you will gain powerful insight into the true experiences of living with dementia. In addition, presenters will discuss practical applications for implementing person driven care and methods to enhance quality of life. You will hear from individuals whose lives have been personally affected by this disease, be engaged through interactive activities, and discover resources that are available to assist families through the journey.

We look forward to seeing you there! To learn more and to register, please visit www.alz.org/gmc. Questions? Call (248) 996-1053 or email trusso@alz.org.

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2013-2014 Alzheimer’s Disease Progress Report: Insights and Challenges

 

Watch this video to learn more about what researchers are doing on a global level to help win the fight against Alzheimer’s disease. Check out the full 2013-2014 Alzheimer’s Disease Progress Report here.

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Clinical Trials for Alzheimer’s Research

clinical trials

Scientists have made enormous strides in understanding how Alzheimer’s disease affects the brain. Many of these insights point toward new therapies and improved ways to diagnose the disease and monitor its progression.

At any given time, dozens of studies are recruiting participants to help explore these exciting new approaches. Every clinical study contributes valuable knowledge, regardless of whether the experimental strategy works as hoped.

Without study participants, however, progress is stalled, and scientists report growing difficulty finding enough volunteers to complete these studies.

If you or a friend or family member has Alzheimer’s or another dementia — or even if you don’t — you can help advance knowledge about this illness. By participating in a clinical study, you can help new treatments, preventive strategies and diagnostic tools to become a reality.

What is a clinical study?

A clinical study is any medical research project involving human volunteers. Research into improved approaches usually begins with laboratory work or animal studies. Following early success with these methods, new strategies must demonstrate their effectiveness in the final proving ground of human testing.

What is a clinical trial?

A clinical trial is a specific type of study in which one group of volunteers gets an experimental treatment, while a similar group gets a placebo ( a look-alike “sugar pill”). Scientists evaluate the effect of the new treatment by comparing outcomes in the two groups.

Phases of clinical trials

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which regulates medical products and drugs, oversees a rigorous process for testing experimental treatments that is based on sequential phases. The treatments must perform well enough in each phase to progress to the next one. If a treatment performs adequately in all stages through Phase III, the FDA reviews the data and determines  whether to approve the drug for use in general medical practice.

  • Phase 1 trials, the first stage of human testing, typically enroll fewer than 100 volunteers. These studies are primarily concerned with assessing the safety of a drug and whether it has risks or side effects.
  • Phase II trials enroll up to a few hundred volunteers with the condition the drug is designed to treat. These studies provide further information about the safety of the drug and focus on determining the best dosage. Scientists also watch for signs of effectiveness, but Phase II trials are generally too small to provide clear evidence about benefit.
  • Phase III trials may enroll several hundred to thousands of volunteers, often at multiple study sites nationwide or internationally. Phase III trials provide the chief evidence for safety and effectiveness that the FDA will consider when deciding whether to approve a new drug.
  • Phase IV trials, also called post-marketing studies, are often required by the FDA after a drug is approved. The trial sponsor must monitor the health of individuals taking the drug to gain further insight into its long-term safety effectiveness and the best way to use it.

How to find a study near you

Alzheimer’s Association TrialMatch is a clinical studies matching service. TrialMatch uses information about your diagnosis, location and preferences to match a person with current clinical studies. Finding the right trial can be done over the phone or online. Once a match is found, and with your permission, a TrialMatch specialist will contact you to answer questions.

If you would like to consider participating in a clinical study, call 1-800-272-3900 or visit alz.org/trialmatch. More information about clinical studies can also be found at clinicaltrials.gov.

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Food for Thought: Diet Choices Linked to Brain Health

Do your snacking habits affect brain health? Could your diet choices help to reduce (or elevate) your risk for diseases like Alzheimer’s? As the prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease continues to rise (more than 5 millions Americans have a diagnosis), many have been intrigued by these questions. Unfortunately, there is no proven method for preventing Alzheimer’s disease and the research into its prevention is lacking. However, an emerging body of scientific research indicates that certain food choices may be conducive to a healthy brain.

Ever heard the axiom “healthy mind, healthy body”? It’s often true! Hypertension, diabetes, high cholesterol, and other chronic diseases have been associated with an increased risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia. These diseases are harmful to the blood vessels in the body, and they can ultimately cause a lack of blood flow to the brain.

Want to ensure that your diet will protect your body and your mind? Adhering to a heart healthy food selection, like the Mediterranean diet, may help.

mcdc6_pyramid_mediterranean

The benefits of diet on heart health are already well-documented, and many researchers believe that these same disease fighting foods can be beneficial in protecting the brain. The studies conducted on this subject have yielded promising results, however, more research must continue in order to learn more about effective prevention strategies for Alzheimer’s.

Don’t forget, aging doesn’t start when we reach 65. It’s happening to us all the time, everyday! Commit to a healthy lifestyle long-term, and you will be more likely to stave off chronic diseases, like Alzheimer’s. Life is a marathon, not a sprint!

grocery store

Want to give it a spin? Below is a sample grocery list that reflects adherence to the Mediterranean diet. The most effective eating plan is one that works with your preferences and lifestyle. Experiment with foods that are most appealing to you and enjoy!

  • Spinach
  • Kale
  • Eggplant
  • Tomatoes
  • Almonds
  • Sweet Potatoes
  • Celery
  • Carrots
  • Salmon
  • Brown rice
  • Whole wheat bread
  • Olive oil
  • Red wine
  • Blueberries
  • Strawberries
  • Bananas
  • Tilapia
  • Basil
  • Oregano
  • Black beans
  • Cannellini beans
  • Whole wheat pasta
  • Tomato sauce
  • Bell peppers
  • Zucchini

References

http://www.alz.org/we_can_help_adopt_a_brain_healthy_diet.asp

Arntzen, K. B. (2011). Impact of cardiovascular risk factors on cognitive function: The Tromsø study. European Journal Of Neurology18(5), 737-743.

Boost your memory by eating right. (2012). Harvard Women’s Health Watch19(12), 1-7.

Féart, C., Samieri, C., Rondeau, V., Amieva, H., Portet, F., Dartigues, J., & … Barberger-Gateau, P. (2009). Adherence to a Mediterranean diet, cognitive decline, and risk of dementia. JAMA: Journal Of The American Medical Association302(6), 638-648. doi:10.1001/jama.2009.1146

Mediterranean diet associated with lower risk of cognitive impairment. (2009). Nurse Prescribing7(3), 134.

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