Posts Tagged alzheimer’s activities

Keepsake Cookbook

Do you and your loved one love cooking? Maybe baking is what makes you feel at home. In either case, there is something to be said about the feeling you get when taking your first bite of a home cooked/baked treat.

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Creating a cookbook with your care partner can be a fun way to reminisce and leave a legacy for generations to come. It can be as simple as compiling old recipe cards or as intricate as creating a recipe book online complete with pictures. Keep in mind that this project doesn’t have to be finished overnight. It can simmer for days, weeks, or months to come!

Step 1: Choose your recipes

What are your family’s trademark recipes? Is there anything that has become a traditional birthday dinner, holiday dish, or rainy day snack?

Step 2: Choose your Methods

You might want to talk with your loved one and decide on a type of cookbook that will best combine your creative style with your skill set. You could write out individual recipes on index cards to insert in a scrapbook, create a larger more intricate scrapbook, or use online websites (e.g. Shurtterfly.com) to make one digitally. Feel free to exercise creative freedom, engage others in the process, and make changes based on skills and abilities.

Step 3: Write your book

Try making the dishes as you go! Talk about the smells, colors, and textures of different foods. Use this time to reminisce and identify fun memories associated with your recipes. Feel free to include these stories in your book! Additionally, if your loved one needs more assistance in the kitchen, be sure to break down each task into clear simple steps.

Step 4: Share your book with others

A cookbook made with you and your loved one is a beautiful representation of your family’s traditions, history, and relationships. You can use this book and its recipes to share your story with other family members and friends.

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Spring Cleaning

Spring Cleaning

It’s that time of year again! The tulips and daffodils are in bloom, the sun is shining, and the weather is warming up to beautiful breezy temperatures. With all of the freshness of blooming nature, why not use this season to bring freshness into your home?

Not only does Spring Cleaning give you an excuse to scrub those areas that get little attention during the closed-in cloudy days of winter, but it can also reduce stress. Clutter and mess can be especially anxiety provoking for people with dementia as it can result in over stimulation. With too much clutter, people can be distracted by their surroundings, confused by the number of objects that they need to ascribe meaning to, and clutter can be a signal that there is work to be done. Additionally, clutter in hallways and walkways can be a fall risk. So, while working to clean and de-clutter your home, why not engage your loved ones in helping?

Ways to involve people with dementia in spring cleaning:

  1. Folding, hanging up, and putting away laundry
  2. Washing dishes
  3. Wiping down tables and countertops
  4. Dusting
  5. Sweeping
  6. Sorting through old magazines

Additional Tips:

  • Break down larger tasks into simpler individual steps
  • Encourage people to be as engaged as their skill set allows
  • When sorting through or dusting pictures, magazines, etc., use this opportunity to reminisce. Just be sure to avoid saying, “Remember when…?”
  • Take breaks when necessary. People with dementia often respond more readily to your emotions than your words, so be careful to not convey exasperation, anxiety or anger with your body language. Try to view these activities as fun and energizing!
  • Engage people in cleaning tasks that they’ve done frequently or enjoyed in the past.
  • Always pay attention to any safety hazards that could come up while cleaning.
  • Remember that the value is in the process rather than the result. If your loved one’s task isn’t finished exactly the way you like it, that’s OK. Use these activities as a chance to engage physically, mentally and socially with your loved one and worry about the results later.

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Calling All Caregivers…You’re Invited!

2017 Alzheimer’s Association Advocacy Forum

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The Alzheimer’s Association will soon be opening registration for the 2017 Advocacy Forum, and we would like to invite you to join us. The Alzheimer’s Association’s Advocacy Forum is a unique opportunity for Alzheimer’s advocates from across the country to gather in Washington, D.C. to directly appeal to their members of Congress about Alzheimer’s disease. Caregivers, persons with the disease, and those that have lost a loved one to Alzheimer’s receive training and embark on Capitol Hill to tell their story and ask for policy change to support our vision of a world without Alzheimer’s. In 2016, over 1,100 people from across the country (24 from Michigan) participated in this event.

Participants of past Forums have raved about this event as an empowering experience. After the Forum advocates feel charged up and ready to tell their story and make change happen. The helpless feeling that often accompanies Alzheimer’s for many is changed into a feeling of power and an opportunity to improve the lives of others.

The Alzheimer’s Association’s Advocacy Forum is also highly impactful for Members of Congress. In our experience, legislators listen intently when their constituents travel to our nation’s capitol to speak with them.

Alzheimer’s is a triple threat, with soaring prevalence, lack of treatment and enormous costs that no one can afford. If we’re going to address this triple threat, action must be taken by all levels of the government. Attending the Advocacy Forum is one way to take action, and we’d love to have you join us!

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About the Alzheimer’s Association’s Advocacy Forum

The 2017 Alzheimer’s Association’s Advocacy Forum will take place March 27-29, 2017 at the Marriott Wardman Park, Washington, D. C. To register and for event details like schedule, location, travel, and more, visit http://www.alz.org/forum or contact Lindsay Brieschke at lbrieschke@alz.org

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2016 Metro Detroit Fall Conference: A Meaningful Life with Alzheimer’s Disease

Early bird registration for our 5th Annual Metro Detroit Fall Conference “A Meaningful Life with Alzheimer’s Disease”, done in collaboration with Wayne State University’s Institute of Gerontology, is now open! The conference will bring together healthcare professionals, caregivers, family members, and individuals living with the early stages of memory loss on Friday, November 18th at Schoolcraft College’s VisTaTech Center in Livonia. Registration includes an entry to the conference, breakfast, lunch, as well as five continuing education credits for professionals.

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We are pleased to announce this year’s keynote speaker will be Beth A. D. Nolan, Ph.D.

Dr. Nolan serves as a Lead Mentor Trainer and Coach and directs research for Positive Approach to Care (PAC). Formerly an Assistant Professor at the University of Pittsburgh’s Graduate School of Public Health, Dr. Nolan received her Ph.D. in applied gerontology. She has worked with a variety of human services agencies to implement evidence-based programs for behavioral health, criminal justice, medicine, and senior living, and now works to help move caregivers to become carepartners.

Conference attendees will gain powerful insight into the true experiences of living with dementia as well as practical applications for implementing person driven care and methods to enhance quality of life. You will hear from individuals whose lives have been personally affected by this disease, engage in interactive activities and discover new resources and tools to assist families through their dementia journey.

 

To learn more visit

alz.org/gmc

or call our 24/7 Helpline at 800.272.3900

We hope to see you on November 18th!

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This conference is sponsored in part by Schoolcraft College.

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Register with Alzheimer’s Association TrialMatch

Clinical trials are essential to advancing Alzheimer’s disease research at a time when Alzheimer’s is reaching epidemic proportions. Through clinical studies conducted over the last 20 years, scientists have made tremendous strides in understanding how Alzheimer’s affects the brain. It is only through clinical studies that we will develop and test promising new strategies for treatment, prevention, diagnosis, and ultimately, a cure for Alzheimer’s disease.

To learn more about how to participate in clinical trial, watch the video below about TrialMatch (a free, clinical-trial matching service).

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Join a Support Group

Have you ever thought about attending a support group but were reluctant to give it a try?

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Support groups are a safe place to share feelings and experiences, and many people find them to be invaluable resources.

A support group is a place to:

  • Exchange practical information on caregiving problems and possible solutions
  • Talk through challenges and ways of coping
  • Share feelings, needs and concerns
  • Learn about resources available in your community

All of our support groups are facilitated by trained individuals. In addition to caregiver support groups, we also have support groups designed specifically for people in the early stages of Alzheimer’s. We are currently offering early stage support groups in Birmingham and Taylor (and soon, in Sterling Heights too!). To learn more or to register, please dial our 24/7 Helpline at 800-272-3900.

Want to find a Alzheimer’s Association support group near you? Click here. Prefer to get support online? Join AlzConnected, our online community.

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Please join us for our Spring Conference in Troy!

5th annual Spring Conference

Please join us for our 5th Annual Spring Conference “Safe and Secure: Approaching Safety in Dementia Care” in collaboration with the Michigan Alzheimer’s Disease Center. We invite healthcare professionals, caregivers, family members, and individuals living in the early stages of memory loss to be our guests at this educational conference taking place on Tuesday, March 29th from 8:00am-3:45pm at the Somerset Inn in Troy. Breakfast and lunch will be provided. Five Continuing Education Credits will be awarded to professionals.

As Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia progress, one’s ability to make good decisions, exercise appropriate judgement, and maintain safety become impaired. Eventually, family and professional caregivers will assume responsibility for ensuring safety and promoting well-being. This conference will discuss various safety-related topics, such as managing medications, financial exploitation, and knowing when it is no longer safe to drive.

To learn more and to register, please visit http://www.alz.org/gmc. We hope to see you on March 29th! 🙂

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