Practice Mindfulness Based Meditation

Mindfulness 2

Mindfulness refers to being fully aware of the present moment — on purpose and without judgment. When we focus our full attention on the present, we are less likely to worry about past or future events. In addition, some research suggests that practising mindfulness routinely may provide significant benefits, such as a greater sense of well-being, reduced stress level, and better physical and mental health outcomes.

In a society that places high importance on multi-tasking and non-stop streaming of information, focusing on one moment at a time is a challenging feat! Follow along with the mindfulness-based meditation exercise below, or make modifications in order for it to be a meaningful experience for you.

Mindfulness

Try it out!

Sit in a comfortable position.

Close your eyes and take a few slow breaths in and out.

Slow down your mind and bring your focus to the sound and feeling of your breath.

Pay attention to the rising and falling of your stomach with each full inhale and exhale.

Calmly assess your current physical state. Are there any muscles that are tighter than normal? Is your body still carrying any weight or stress from the day?

Let go of these thoughts and feelings.

Do not burden your body and mind with negative thoughts.

You are relaxing in this moment. 

Breath out the discomfort and focus on the tranquility of your body.

Focus on how good your body and mind feel to relax.

Want to learn more? Look into the work of Dr. Jon Kabat-Zinn (the pioneer of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction) or check out this website for more ideas on how to incorporate mindfulness into your day.

References

Christopher A. Pepping , Analise O’Donovan & Penelope J. Davis (2013) The positive effects of
mindfulness on self-esteem, The Journal of Positive Psychology: Dedicated to furthering research and promoting good practice, 8:5, 376-386

Kabat-Zinn, J., & Gazella, K. (2005). Jon Kabat-Zinn, PhD: bringing mindfulness to medicine. Alternative Therapies In Health & Medicine, 11(3), 56-64.

Marion Martin (2010) Mindfulness- and acceptance-based behavioral therapies in practice, British Journal of Guidance & Counselling, 38:1, 133-135

http://www.themindfulword.org/2012/mbsr-mindfulness-based-stress-reduction/

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